Interstate highway – I69 Texas http://i69texas.org/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 23:51:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://i69texas.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-3-150x150.png Interstate highway – I69 Texas http://i69texas.org/ 32 32 The state’s landscape changed with the interstate highway system – The Courier https://i69texas.org/the-states-landscape-changed-with-the-interstate-highway-system-the-courier/ https://i69texas.org/the-states-landscape-changed-with-the-interstate-highway-system-the-courier/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 19:54:06 +0000 https://i69texas.org/the-states-landscape-changed-with-the-interstate-highway-system-the-courier/ It took a lot of work and equipment to build the Tennessee interstate system. The idea was to facilitate travel from one part of the country to another in the event of a national emergency. Bill CareyTennessee History for Kids Most of us, I guess, don’t think much about what life would have been like […]]]>

It took a lot of work and equipment to build the Tennessee interstate system. The idea was to facilitate travel from one part of the country to another in the event of a national emergency.

Bill Carey
Tennessee History for Kids

Most of us, I guess, don’t think much about what life would have been like without the interstate highway system.
But if it weren’t for the freeways, most of us wouldn’t be living where we live and vacationing like we do.
The US government began funding the interstate highway system in 1956. The idea was to make it easier to travel from one part of the country to another in the event of a national military emergency. Designed for speed and with limited access, America’s highways were modeled after a German highway called the Autobahn.
The way the interstate system was paid is a bit complicated and has changed over the years. Suffice it to say that its main funding mechanism was and remains the gas tax.
The interstate system plan closely followed a US government publication known as the “Yellow Book” (which you can still see on the Internet). The “yellow book” laid out the general routes of the interstate national system and showed where freeway corridors would be built in each American city.
It took a long time for the highways to be built. Bridges had to be built and roads cleared through mountainous areas such as the Cumberland Plateau.
The first sections of freeway through Tennessee were opened in 1958, with most of the 40 and 65 highways across the state completed by the 1960s. The freeways were not opened all at once, but one section at a time; For many years, a driver had to get an updated road map to find out which stretches of the shiny new highway were open.
Today there are over 1,100 miles of interstate freeways in Tennessee. These highways have dramatically reduced the time it takes to travel from one part of the state to another.
Before the creation of Interstate 40, for example, it took maybe 10 hours to drive from Nashville to Knoxville, passing through cities like Lebanon, Sparta, Crossville, Rockwood and Kingston. Now it only takes three.
Today, freeways make it possible to live in one county and work in another, and have transformed once small towns like Franklin, Farragut, and Bartlett into residential suburbs.
The freeways also allowed for day trips across the state. Before the advent of interstate highways, it’s hard to imagine 100,000 people traveling to Knoxville just for an event on Saturday afternoon. Now, that happens about half a dozen times each fall.
Highways also made traveling by car much safer than before, as they were wider and better designed.
Most people see highways as a positive change. But commercial activity in cities like Cookeville, Manchester and Jackson has shifted completely from the city center to the nearest freeway exit. If you drive to these city squares today, you can see clear signs that there was a lot more going on than today.
Interstate construction has also proven to be very controversial in Tennessee cities.
To this day, some members of the African-American community in Nashville say that the route chosen by Interstate 40, just west of the city, has split black Nashville in two. In Memphis, Overton Park fans organized against the construction of Interstate 40 through this park in the 1960s. Eventually, this case went to the United States Supreme Court, which in the Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe, ruled in favor of the group fighting Interstate 40. This is why the freeway circles Memphis, rather than crossing it.
(Bill Carey is the founder and executive director of Tennessee History for Kids, a nonprofit organization that helps teachers cover social studies. He is also the author of several history books and a former Capitol Hill reporter. .)

(This week’s TN For Kids story is brought to you by List4Less Realty in Savannah and the Tennessee Press Association.)


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/the-states-landscape-changed-with-the-interstate-highway-system-the-courier/feed/ 0
Ike’s Virtual Book Club takes a look at the interstate highway system https://i69texas.org/ikes-virtual-book-club-takes-a-look-at-the-interstate-highway-system/ https://i69texas.org/ikes-virtual-book-club-takes-a-look-at-the-interstate-highway-system/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 12:08:19 +0000 https://i69texas.org/ikes-virtual-book-club-takes-a-look-at-the-interstate-highway-system/ ABILENE – It’s almost time for Ike’s Virtual Book Club. The next virtual book club is scheduled for Tuesday at 7 p.m. Central time. The program is open to the public at no cost. You can register online or by phone. Please register 10 minutes in advance so the program can start on time. Join […]]]>

ABILENE – It’s almost time for Ike’s Virtual Book Club.

The next virtual book club is scheduled for Tuesday at 7 p.m. Central time. The program is open to the public at no cost. You can register online or by phone. Please register 10 minutes in advance so the program can start on time.

Join this program as if you were meeting your friends in a cafe or a cozy living room with a glass of wine – even if you haven’t read the book.

The September selection of books is Divided Highways: Building the Interstate System, Transforming American Life by Tom Lewis.

No other infrastructure project has changed the landscape of American daily life perhaps more than the interstate highway system. Lewis provides a comprehensive history of the people and policies related to highway development in the United States.

The full reading list program is available on the Eisenhower Presidential Library website (www.eisenhowerlibrary.gov).

MEETING OPTIONS
Google Meet online: https://meet.google.com/weh-dbru-kpp.

Telephone: 617-675-4444 (PIN: 814 570 732 2178 #).

The Ike Book Talk 2021 series is made possible by the Eisenhower Foundation, the Jeffcoat Foundation, Humanities Kansas and the Abilene Public Library. For more details on this event, visit eisenhowerlibrary.gov.

About the Eisenhower Presidential Library

The Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum is one of 15 Presidential Libraries maintained by the National Archives and Records Administration. Presidential Libraries promote understanding of the presidency and the American experience. They preserve and provide access to historical documents, support research, and create interactive programs and exhibits that educate and inspire. Public programs and exhibits at the Eisenhower Presidential Library are made possible in part through the generous support of the Eisenhower Foundation. To learn more, visit eisenhowerlibrary.gov.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/ikes-virtual-book-club-takes-a-look-at-the-interstate-highway-system/feed/ 0
How the Interstate Highway System Changed the Tennessee Landscape https://i69texas.org/how-the-interstate-highway-system-changed-the-tennessee-landscape/ https://i69texas.org/how-the-interstate-highway-system-changed-the-tennessee-landscape/#respond Thu, 09 Sep 2021 21:00:45 +0000 https://i69texas.org/how-the-interstate-highway-system-changed-the-tennessee-landscape/ Bill Carey is the founder and executive director of Tennessee History for Kids. I suspect most of us don’t think much about what life would have been like without the Interstate Highway System. When you think about it, we realize that most of us wouldn’t live where we live and vacation like we take our […]]]>
  • Bill Carey is the founder and executive director of Tennessee History for Kids.

I suspect most of us don’t think much about what life would have been like without the Interstate Highway System. When you think about it, we realize that most of us wouldn’t live where we live and vacation like we take our vacations.

The US government began funding the Interstate Highway System in 1956. The idea was to make it easier to travel from one part of the country to another in the event of a national military emergency. Designed for speed and with limited access, America’s highways were modeled after a German highway called the Autobahn.

The way the interstate system was paid is a bit complicated and has changed over the years. Suffice it to say that its primary funding mechanism was, and still is, the gasoline tax.

The interstate system plan closely followed a U.S. government publication known as the Yellow book, which you can still see on the Internet. The Yellow book mapped out the general routes of the national interstate system and showed where freeway corridors would be built in each American city.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/how-the-interstate-highway-system-changed-the-tennessee-landscape/feed/ 0
Tennessee Landscape Changed With Interstate Freeway System | Opinion https://i69texas.org/tennessee-landscape-changed-with-interstate-freeway-system-opinion/ https://i69texas.org/tennessee-landscape-changed-with-interstate-freeway-system-opinion/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 03:30:00 +0000 https://i69texas.org/tennessee-landscape-changed-with-interstate-freeway-system-opinion/ Most of us, I guess, don’t think much about what life would have been like without the interstate highway system. But if it weren’t for the freeways, most of us wouldn’t be living where we live and vacationing like we do. The US government began funding the interstate highway system in 1956. The idea was […]]]>

Most of us, I guess, don’t think much about what life would have been like without the interstate highway system. But if it weren’t for the freeways, most of us wouldn’t be living where we live and vacationing like we do.

The US government began funding the interstate highway system in 1956. The idea was to make it easier to travel from one part of the country to another in the event of a national military emergency. Designed for speed and with limited access, America’s highways were modeled after a German highway called the Autobahn.

The way the interstate system was paid is a bit complicated and has changed over the years. Suffice it to say that its main funding mechanism was and remains the gas tax.

The interstate system plan closely followed a US government publication known as the “Yellow Book” (which you can still see on the Internet). would be built in every American city.

It took a long time for the highways to be built. Bridges had to be built and roads cleared through mountainous areas such as the Cumberland Plateau. The first sections of freeway through Tennessee were opened in 1958, with most of the 40 and 65 highways across the state completed during the 1960s.

The highways weren’t opened all at once, but one section at a time; For many years, a driver had to get an updated road map to find out which stretches of the shiny new highway were open.

Today there are over 1,100 miles of interstate freeways in Tennessee. These highways have dramatically reduced the time it takes to travel from one part of the state to another. Before the creation of Interstate 40, for example, it took maybe 10 hours to drive from Nashville to Knoxville, passing through cities like Lebanon, Sparta, Crossville, Rockwood and Kingston. Now it only takes three.

Today, freeways make it possible to live in one county and work in another, and have transformed once small towns like Franklin, Farragut, and Bartlett into residential suburbs. The freeways also allowed for day trips across the state.

Before the advent of interstate highways, it’s hard to imagine 100,000 people traveling to Knoxville just for an event on Saturday afternoon. Now, that happens about half a dozen times each fall.

Highways also made traveling by car much safer than before, as they were wider and better designed.

Most people see highways as a positive change. But commercial activity in cities like Cookeville, Manchester and Jackson has shifted completely from the city center to the nearest freeway exit. If you drive to these city squares today, you can see clear signs that there was a lot more going on than today.

Interstate construction has also proven to be very controversial in Tennessee cities. To this day, some members of the African-American community in Nashville say that the route chosen by Interstate 40, just west of the city, has split black Nashville in two. In Memphis, Overton Park fans organized against the construction of Interstate 40 through this park in the 1960s. Eventually, this case went to the United States Supreme Court, which in the Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe, ruled in favor of the group fighting Interstate 40. This is why the freeway bypasses Memphis rather than crossing it.

Bill Carey is a former Tennessean, Nashville Scene, WPLN, and NashvillePost.com reporter who now works as the executive director of a nonprofit organization known as Tennessee History for Kids. He also writes a monthly history column for Tennessee Magazine.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/tennessee-landscape-changed-with-interstate-freeway-system-opinion/feed/ 0
FreightWaves Classics: US Army Pershing and Eisenhower Impacted Interstate Highway System https://i69texas.org/freightwaves-classics-us-army-pershing-and-eisenhower-impacted-interstate-highway-system/ https://i69texas.org/freightwaves-classics-us-army-pershing-and-eisenhower-impacted-interstate-highway-system/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 18:04:06 +0000 https://i69texas.org/freightwaves-classics-us-army-pershing-and-eisenhower-impacted-interstate-highway-system/ FreightWaves Classics has covered the history of the Interstate Highway System in previous articles. In these articles, it was noted that the US military had organized the Motor Transport Corps convoy to cross the United States. The mission of the convoy was to test the usefulness of the existing roads in the event of a […]]]>

FreightWaves Classics has covered the history of the Interstate Highway System in previous articles. In these articles, it was noted that the US military had organized the Motor Transport Corps convoy to cross the United States. The mission of the convoy was to test the usefulness of the existing roads in the event of a national emergency.

The convoy began its journey on July 7, 1919; 79 Army vehicles left Washington, DC for San Francisco along the Lincoln Highway. The Lincoln Highway was one of the country’s first transcontinental roads and was 3,389 miles long. The convoy included nearly 300 soldiers and observers from the US War Department (among them was Lt. Col. Dwight D. Eisenhower, who would play a key role in the development of US highways later in his life).

The 1919 convoy in Wyoming.  (Photo: wyohistory.org)
The 1919 convoy in Wyoming. (Photo: wyohistory.org)

At that time, sections of the Lincoln Highway were made up of dirt and gravel tracks – and in some places the “roadway” of the road was made of loose sand. Bad weather and steep slopes sometimes made the road impassable. Many bridges (especially in the western United States) were demolished and rebuilt to allow heavy vehicles in the convoy to continue. The trip to San Francisco Bay lasted 62 days; and the average convoy speed was only 6.07 mph.

As the number of cars and trucks grew rapidly, the trip highlighted the poor condition of the country’s roads. The long time it took for the convoy to make the trip, the extremely poor condition of the “highway” and the numerous mechanical breakdowns were all proof that major improvements had to be made.

The beginnings of a national road network

As a result of the convoy’s cross-country trip and its reports of poor US roads, the Bureau of Public Roads (a precursor to the Federal Highway Administration) tasked General John J. Pershing, the most senior member. senior officer of the United States military, to draw a map to give the government a better understanding of the routes in the United States that were most important in the event of war.

A 1957 map shows the plan for the Interstate Highway System as the original system was just beginning to be built.  Like the 1947 map above, it is very similar to the Pershing map from 1922. (Map: Federal Roads Administration)
General Pershing. (Photo: PBS.org)

Under Pershing’s leadership, the military complied with the Bureau’s request. On this date in 1922, General Pershing signed the “Pershing Map”, which describes a system of national roads developed by the military authorities to be of particular importance for national defense. Those who created the map used the 1919 convoy reports to help draw a detailed network of interconnected main roads that the military considered essential for national defense.

The 1922 Pershing map (Image: Federal Roads Administration)
The 1922 Pershing map (Image: Federal Roads Administration)

Therefore, the Pershing Map was the first official topographic road map of the United States. It included 78,000 miles of roads with an emphasis on covering coastal areas and border posts considered necessary for national defense.

The general position of the War Department was that a system designed to meet the industrial and commercial needs of the nation could also adequately meet the needs of the military.

Additional road studies demonstrated the need for a federally maintained road network that could support national defense and interstate commerce. Pershing’s map was an early model for nationally connected highways, surface roads, and feeder roads. Although it was superseded by later planning, many routes plotted on Pershing’s map today are interstate highways.

Pershing’s map led to major road construction projects throughout the 1920s, which until the stock market crash of late September 1929 was a decade of prosperity. Projects such as the New York Parkway System were built as part of a new national highway system. Automobile and truck traffic continued to increase; planners recognized the need for an interconnected national highway system to provide an alternative to the existing, largely non-highway system of American roads.

A 1947 map shows a plan for interstate highways.  Many routes are very similar to those on the Pershing map, created 25 years ago.  (Map: Federal Roads Administration)
A 1947 map shows a plan for interstate highways. Many routes are very similar to those on the Pershing map, created 25 years ago. (Map: Federal Roads Administration)

The Great Depression and World War II slow road construction

However, despite support from the military, the War Department, and some members of Congress, overall support for the costly public works project has remained low. Planning for such a system continued throughout the 1930s; however, the impact of the Great Depression and then of World War II meant that little of the planning was implemented.

In 1942 (almost 20 years after the creation of the Pershing map), President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the National Interregional Highway Committee to investigate the viability of an interstate highway system. The committee published its report in 1944. It refined the concepts found in Pershing’s map and emphasized long-distance transcontinental routes. But it wasn’t until the mid-1950s that a plan for what would one day be called the “Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate Highways and Defense” was drafted.

A 1957 map shows the plan for the Interstate Highway System as the original system was just beginning to be built.  Like the 1947 map above, it is very similar to the Pershing map from 1922. (Map: Federal Roads Administration)
A 1957 map shows the plan for the Interstate Highway System as the original system was just beginning to be built. Like the 1947 map above, it is very similar to the Pershing map from 1922. (Map: Federal Roads Administration)

Federal Highway Act and the birth of the Interstate Highway System

President Eisenhower signed the Federal Highway Act of 1956, which authorized 41,000 miles of interstate highways. The first mile was built the same year; it was estimated that the entire interstate road network (IHS) would be completed by 1976.

However, the IHS was not considered complete until 1991 (and improvements, new interstate highways, etc. continue to this day). In addition, the interstate highway system is under constant analysis in the best interests of defense, commerce and public use. Although the system is a vital public resource, it remains an objective of the Defense Ministry’s strategic road network. This network is a 140,000-mile network of government-designated highways and roads connecting military installations, economic centers, railways and ports.

President Eisenhower signs the Federal Highway Act of 1956, authorizing the construction of the Interstate Highway System.  (Photo: Federal Roads Administration)
President Eisenhower signs the Federal Highway Act of 1956, authorizing the construction of the Interstate Highway System.
(Photo: Federal Roads Administration)

What is often referred to as the largest public works project in American history is overseen by the Federal Highway Administration of the United States Department of Transportation, in partnership with local and state transportation agencies. While maintaining and expanding the IHS are civilian responsibilities, the military remains a crucial player in the mix. Its Transportation Engineering Agency (TEA), a division of the Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command, continuously assesses interstate highways to determine if they meet the needs of the Department of Defense. TEA also coordinates with public agencies to establish policy regarding the military use of public roads.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/freightwaves-classics-us-army-pershing-and-eisenhower-impacted-interstate-highway-system/feed/ 0
Internal workings of the interstate highway system https://i69texas.org/internal-workings-of-the-interstate-highway-system/ https://i69texas.org/internal-workings-of-the-interstate-highway-system/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 11:16:53 +0000 https://i69texas.org/internal-workings-of-the-interstate-highway-system/ (WYTV) – Uncover the secrets of the interstate highway system. The official name of these routes is the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways. It started in 1956 and ended in 1992. It covers 46,000 miles and is a quick way to get from here to there. The numbering system is […]]]>

(WYTV) – Uncover the secrets of the interstate highway system.

The official name of these routes is the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways.

It started in 1956 and ended in 1992.

It covers 46,000 miles and is a quick way to get from here to there.

The numbering system is easy to understand. Even highways, such as I-80, extend east and west; odd-numbered highways, like I-79, move traffic north and south.

For east-west highways, the lowest figures are in the south and the highest figures in the north. I-10 is in Jacksonville, Florida and I-90 is in Cleveland.

For highways north to south, the lower numbers are in the west, such as I-5 in California. Higher numbers are found in the east, such as I-79 in Mercer, PA.

What about those triple-digit freeways, like the I-680? This first number, the even number 6 in this case, means that it is a ring road or a loop around a city. If the first digit is an odd number, like I-376 in Mercer County, then it’s a long connector.

Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico all have freeways, although they are clearly not connected to other states. They have special lettering – Alaska has A1 to A4, Hawaii has H1 to H3, and Puerto Rico has PR1 and PR2.

The I-90 is the longest highway in the United States, stretching from Boston to Seattle and covering nearly 3,100 miles and 13 states.

A shorter freeway, the I-95, covers only 1,900 miles but crosses the most states – 15. If you’re careful, the odd “95” tells you it’s north and south, and the high number means it’s east. I-95 connects Miami to Maine.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/internal-workings-of-the-interstate-highway-system/feed/ 0
Senate clears new interstate highway between Texas and Georgia https://i69texas.org/senate-clears-new-interstate-highway-between-texas-and-georgia/ https://i69texas.org/senate-clears-new-interstate-highway-between-texas-and-georgia/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://i69texas.org/senate-clears-new-interstate-highway-between-texas-and-georgia/ Senators Ted Cruz and John Cornyn worked on amendments to the bipartisan infrastructure bill, including one that would create a new freeway between Texas and Georgia. pmoseley@star-telegram.com Washington Interstate 14 would be widened to cross central Texas and cover much of the eastern Sun Belt before ending in Georgia, according to a plan approved by […]]]>

title=

Senators Ted Cruz and John Cornyn worked on amendments to the bipartisan infrastructure bill, including one that would create a new freeway between Texas and Georgia.

Interstate 14 would be widened to cross central Texas and cover much of the eastern Sun Belt before ending in Georgia, according to a plan approved by the Senate and pending House action.

“This is a bipartisan amendment that will link important military bases but also provide economic growth and jobs from the Permian Basin to the Atlantic,” Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas, told the Star-Telegram. He and Senator Raphael Warnock, D-Georgia, sponsored the proposal.

The Senate accepted the Cruz-Warnock amendment on a voice vote. He now needs the approval of the House, which is not expected to return to votes until September 20.

I-14 is a 25 mile stretch of highway that runs from Belton to Fort Hood. Cruz and Warnock’s amendment would extend I-14 to start in Odessa and cross central Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama before ending in Augusta, Georgia.

The Senate considered changes to its $ 1,000 billion infrastructure bill all week. Senator John Cornyn, a Republican from Texas, joined with Senator Alex Padilla, a Democrat from California, on an amendment that would allow states and local governments to use 30% of their unspent COVID-19 relief funds for infrastructure.

The 30% cap on unspent COVID-19 funds came after negotiations with the White House, Cornyn told reporters. Several Senate Democrats have expressed support for Cornyn and Padilla’s amendment and it is expected to pass by an overwhelming majority, Cornyn said.

Currently, state and local governments must use COVID-19 relief funds for the intended purposes of managing the pandemic and stabilizing local governments and economies.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/senate-clears-new-interstate-highway-between-texas-and-georgia/feed/ 0
The US Interstate Highway network shows us the future of electric vehicle charging https://i69texas.org/the-us-interstate-highway-network-shows-us-the-future-of-electric-vehicle-charging/ https://i69texas.org/the-us-interstate-highway-network-shows-us-the-future-of-electric-vehicle-charging/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://i69texas.org/the-us-interstate-highway-network-shows-us-the-future-of-electric-vehicle-charging/ On my recent trip across the country, I realized how strange America’s road network is. The numbers can be inconsistent, construction practices differ (sometimes significantly), and sometimes the system just isn’t really complete. US Highway 70 between Raleigh, North Carolina, and the coast, now also known as “Future Interstate 42,” is a prime example of […]]]>

On my recent trip across the country, I realized how strange America’s road network is. The numbers can be inconsistent, construction practices differ (sometimes significantly), and sometimes the system just isn’t really complete. US Highway 70 between Raleigh, North Carolina, and the coast, now also known as “Future Interstate 42,” is a prime example of incompleteness.

The biggest downside was that the road continued to switch between the freeway and the surface street, often without any real warning other than a lowering of the speed limit and maybe a few flashing lights. For attentive people, this is not at all a problem, but we know how it goes. A tractor-trailer driver almost hit me from behind when I was pulled over at the first traffic light in a town, and there have been several times that someone randomly nailed the brakes in front of me because they lifted his head in telephone stupor and suddenly noticed a traffic light (but didn’t quite realize it was green before slamming the pedal off just in case).

Incomplete and unfinished highways

Once they’ve improved or bypassed those sections of road and turned it all into a cohesive interstate standard highway, things will be a lot safer and easier, but for now it’s a weird mishmash that’s annoying. those who pay attention and trap those who are not. .

The experience reminded me of some things my grandfather told me about the freeways decades ago. I grew up with I-25, I-10, and I-40, all of which were a continuous four-lane stretch through New Mexico, but there was a time when only one side was terminated on several stretches, and for years there was a freeway with only 2 lanes near Truth or Consequences.

However, not all sections of the highway have been so fortunate. Some were never completed at all, often due to local opposition, funding issues, or a combination of the two. If you’ve driven a lot in Los Angeles, you’ve probably noticed the odd way La Cienega Blvd. turns into a freeway in the Baldwin Hills, but then reverts to a normal street on the other side. Turns out it was meant to be part of a Laurel Canyon freeway, but opposition to it, especially in its namesake canyon, has doomed the project to become just a weird little bit.

Entire books could be written on these incomplete highways, but you can read all about them here on Wikipedia.

Gaps and non-compliance with standards

Another strange thing that you will notice if you start looking at the maps is the gaps in the Interstate freeway system. Some of the gaps exist because there is a plan to eventually fill them, so the states that built them have given them the same number. Some of these gaps, especially for Interstate 69, are huge, and no one knows when (or if) the states between segments will ever fill them.

In other cases, there are actually duplicate Interstate numbers for the freeways, there is no connection plan. The standards body that chooses Interstate numbers believes that these duplicate numbered highways are so far apart that they won’t cause confusion, and they didn’t want states to continue using N, S, E or W as suffixes for Interstate numbers.

For a variety of reasons, there are permanent sections of the Interstate freeway that just don’t meet standards. Interstate 19 (America’s only metric highway) turns into a regular surface street for the last bit where it connects to a border crossing with Mexico. It made sense to keep the I-19 signs so people didn’t get lost and could easily find the freeway. There is also the famous section of freeway in Breezewood, Pa. Where an Interstate freeway had to end before it could connect to a toll freeway for legal reasons. It is known for the tight packing of restaurant chains and gas stations.

For convenience, there are also a few places where an Interstate freeway has an “on-grade” intersection with another road, or in other words, there is an encounter with a no-exit road and underpasses or overpasses. In most cases, this is because the freeway has to be connected to a rarely used road or to a single home or business, and it just doesn’t make financial sense to spend millions to build a real setup. exit for the few vehicles that would enter or exit the freeway over there.

There are also a number of inconsistencies in the Interstate Highway System numbering system. For example, there is no I-50 or I-60 freeway as those numbers could conflict with the US road system (which has higher numbers when heading south, to the opposite of what highways do). There are also “child” roads that never connect with their parent freeway for a variety of reasons, and even an entire freeway in California without any parents (I-238), which was simply given the state freeway number of. ‘origin.

What all of this can tell us about the future of EV charging stations

Charging station networks are experiencing growth difficulties similar to those of the first interstate highway system and, until very recently, in some cases were roughly equivalent to the original “automatic tracks” that existed before the interstate and US highway systems. The first people to drive across the United States had a rough time, including a military expedition that included a young Dwight D. Eisenhower, who later became a big supporter of the system.

Until Electrify America stations popped up along major highways, driving across the country in something like a Nissan LEAF could be a huge pain. Brian Kent’s Negative Carbon Roadtrip took a lot longer than most in their right mind realized (on the order of a few months, but taking a complicated route), and even shorter jaunts in my LEAF 2018 were still tremendous pain. The early Tesla owners, who took these kinds of road trips before the Supercharger network grew, have seen similar trials.

Even Tesla’s well-developed network of superchargers does not meet all needs. Sure, that’s way ahead of what you’d get with a CHAdeMO or CCS car, but there are still significant gaps, and Tesla has spent a lot of money on the problem. Biden says he wants to build 500,000 charging stations, which would certainly help solve the problem if such a thing could go through the Senate, but again, this is another shot of money, and it would certainly leave still loopholes in the system that make it difficult to change it.

The big point here is that throwing money at a problem doesn’t guarantee that it will be perfect, even if we have been spending money on it for decades. The Interstate Highway System still has gaps, inconsistencies and continues to catch up as rural areas expand and cities push. Cities that were small when the system was new are becoming major players, requiring even more roads and expansions, so it’s an ongoing process that won’t really catch up. Anyone who promises to fix everything is selling a lie, even if they are doing it for good reasons.

I’m not saying that we shouldn’t keep trying, because it’s an important thing to have the best possible result. However, we must keep our expectations realistic. No big investment or government spending spree will create a truly perfect EV charging network. Getting 90-95% of the way is probably enough.

Do you appreciate the originality of CleanTechnica? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician or Ambassador – or Patreon Patron.


Advertising



Got a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise or suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/the-us-interstate-highway-network-shows-us-the-future-of-electric-vehicle-charging/feed/ 0
Interstate Highway Safety Devices Save ‘Thousands of Lives Every Year’: Report | 2021-07-19 https://i69texas.org/interstate-highway-safety-devices-save-thousands-of-lives-every-year-report-2021-07-19/ https://i69texas.org/interstate-highway-safety-devices-save-thousands-of-lives-every-year-report-2021-07-19/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://i69texas.org/interstate-highway-safety-devices-save-thousands-of-lives-every-year-report-2021-07-19/ Washington – An estimated 6,555 lives were saved in 2019 due to various safety features of the interstate road network, making interstate travel much safer than on any other road, according to a recently released report from the Transportation Research Information Program. The report examines the use, condition and benefits of the 65-year-old interstate highway […]]]>

Washington – An estimated 6,555 lives were saved in 2019 due to various safety features of the interstate road network, making interstate travel much safer than on any other road, according to a recently released report from the Transportation Research Information Program.

The report examines the use, condition and benefits of the 65-year-old interstate highway system while analyzing the findings of a 2019 Transportation Research Board report on highways, prepared at the request of Congress.

Analysis of Federal Highway Administration data found that in 2019, the fatality rate per 100 million vehicle kilometers traveled was 0.55 on highways, compared to 1.3 on all other roads. Researchers from TRIP, a nonprofit that studies surface transportation issues, formed their estimate of lives saved in 2019 by comparing rates while calculating the additional deaths that would have occurred if interstate travel had occurred. occurred on other routes.

“Because it carries large volumes of traffic on roads with higher safety standards and lower road fatalities, the interstate road network saves thousands of lives every year,” the report says.

According to TRIP, features that make highways safer than other roads include:

  • Separation from other roads and railways
  • A minimum of four lanes
  • Smoother curves
  • Paved shoulders
  • Median barriers
  • Rough tapes to warn drivers when they leave the road

The report adds, “Travel on the country’s interstate highways is increasing at a rate almost three times the rate of adding new lanes. From 2000 to 2019, interstate travel by large trucks increased 43%, and overall vehicle travel increased 26%. Large trucks accounted for 12% of all kilometers driven between states in 2019.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/interstate-highway-safety-devices-save-thousands-of-lives-every-year-report-2021-07-19/feed/ 0
Interstate road network needs a new form of sustainable financing https://i69texas.org/interstate-road-network-needs-a-new-form-of-sustainable-financing/ https://i69texas.org/interstate-road-network-needs-a-new-form-of-sustainable-financing/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://i69texas.org/interstate-road-network-needs-a-new-form-of-sustainable-financing/ Photo by Steven Lewis on Unsplash Amid congressional battles over infrastructure finance legislation, the 48,000-mile Interstate Highway System (IHS) quietly reached a milestone on June 29. On this date in 1956, President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Road Act authorizing the system and creating the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) to finance its construction. The IHS […]]]>

Photo by Steven Lewis on Unsplash

Amid congressional battles over infrastructure finance legislation, the 48,000-mile Interstate Highway System (IHS) quietly reached a milestone on June 29. On this date in 1956, President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Road Act authorizing the system and creating the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) to finance its construction.

The IHS continues to serve as the backbone of the US economy, according to the American Road and Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA), noting that nearly 75% of road freight is carried along its sidewalks. And although the IHS only accounts for 1% of total road kilometers, it manages 26% of the kilometers driven by vehicles.

Since its inception, the IHS has helped create many industries that have transformed the American economic landscape, including accommodation, fast food and restaurants, tourism, and convenience stores. Each year, these sectors contribute billions of dollars and millions of jobs to the economy.

The challenges of aging highways

But these business areas depend on a well-maintained, secure, and functioning interstate system. America’s population has doubled since 1956, and the IHS has seen the number of kilometers traveled by vehicle skyrocket by 422%. In addition, at 65, he has far exceeded his initial projections. According to the ARTBA:

  • The nominal life of interstate pavements in the 1950s and 1960s was 20 years. More than a third of IHS miles exceed the 50+ mark.
  • Almost a third of the bridges along the IHS (18,000 out of a total of 58,500) are in need of repair or replacement, and 57% of all bridges are in “fair” condition. The average age of bridge is 46 years old.
  • Traffic jams on overwhelmed U.S. highways cost more than $ 9 billion in 2019, with truckers being delayed by nearly 149 million hours.

“Highways need an investment to stay healthy and vibrant for the future,” says Dr. Alison Premo Black, chief economist of ARTBA. “A renewed federal commitment to America’s transportation system is one of the best ways to preserve Eisenhower’s legacy and ensure that highways remain the engine of economic growth for decades to come. “Editorial idea Interstates Turns 65 ChartAmerican Association of Road and Transportation Builders

HTF needs funding

Debate continues on the federal bill to increase investment in infrastructure, with a significant portion to be devoted to roads and highways. But even if such legislation is passed, it would be a drop in the bucket to meet the long-term needs of the interstate system. Nor will it succeed in solving its most pressing problem: the funding mechanisms of the HTF. The HTF faced a long-term struggle to maintain its solvency, and only regular injections from the general fund stemmed the bleeding.

There is little argument that the main funding mechanism – fuel taxes – is no longer sufficient. Fuel tax rates have not been increased at the federal level since 1993; the kilometers traveled by vehicles have grown slowly; and the growing use of electric vehicles continues to eat away at fuel tax revenue.

Congress has always chosen to strike the ball when it comes to addressing the challenges facing the HTF. However, the expiration of the FAST law at the end of September offers another opportunity to identify and implement meaningful solutions. The question is whether lawmakers – already months after the start of negotiations on a larger infrastructure package – will have the courage to face yet another monumental legislative task … 2022 or even beyond.


Source link

]]>
https://i69texas.org/interstate-road-network-needs-a-new-form-of-sustainable-financing/feed/ 0